Astronomy Guide June 2022



Dear Stargazer Friends,

I hope you have been well. Astronomically speaking, May has been a good month over here with the Total Lunar Eclipse of 16 May 2022 and a short trip to La Creuse in France, a region basically without light pollution. Its Regional Natural Park of Millevaches in Limousin has recently been designated “International Dark Sky Reserve”.

Stargazing is just awesome there and it’s good to know that there are still dark sky places left in Western Europe. Something that is certainly not the case in Switzerland where, unfortunately, there is very little awareness of light pollution and even less political/public support to reduce artificial light at night. At the same, time we as individuals can make a small but important difference in everyday life.

Now to the astronomical outlook for June. Summer Solstice will be on 21 June at 0914 UTC (1014 CET). Therefore, nights are getting shorter and shorter till 21 June, so it’s not an ideal month for astronomy. But we’ll have a Supermoon (Strawberry Supermoon) on 14 June. And if you happen to be up early once every while this month, look southeast before dawn/at dawn and you’ll see Planets Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. Depending on your latitude (45°N-80°N), you may see noctilucent clouds (read more in chapter “Phenomena not to miss in June”).

Provided you have the right equipment to protect your eyes, you can observe our nearest Star, the Sun in June.

Clears skies and best wishes,
Isa

Milky Way towards the Constellation of Cygnus. Picture taken in La Creuse, France, May 2022

Moon phases June 2022

Total Lunar Eclipse 15 May 2022

Moon phases

PhaseDate
First Quarter07 June, 16:48
Full Moon (Super Strawberry Moon)14 June, 13:51
Third Quarter21 June, 05:10
New Moon29 June, 04:52
All times CET; Source: timeanddate.ch

Meteor Showers

Picture by Isabel Streit 2022
Sagittariids
1 June – 15 July
Peak on 19 June. Radiant point in Y Sagittarii. Difficult to observe from northern hemisphere.
June Bootid meteor shower
22 June – 2 July
Peak around 27 June. Radiant point in the constellation of Boötes. 
Corvids
24 June – 1 July
Peak on 26 June 2022. Radiant point in the constellation of Corvus.
Source: Kosmos Himmels-Jahr 2022, Hans-Ulrich Keller

Planets

The Moon, Mars and Jupiter on 22 June 2022 at dawn. Image source: Stellarium.org

For your local times check In-the-Sky (ephemeris)

Mercury is not observable from northern parts of Europe. However, it can be observed from Mediterranean countries as well as from the Tropics and the Southern hemisphere.

Venus is visible all month (constellation of Aries till 17 June, in Taurus from 18 June) and will rise earlier as the month progresses. On 15 June, it will rise at 0353 CET and on 30 June at 0345 CET. On 11 June, it will pass 1°36’ south of Uranus. However, this event will not be observable from Switzerland.

Mars will be observable during the second part of the night – in Pisces till 3 June, then in Cetus till 8 June, and again in Pisces from 10 June. On 22 June, look E/SE at dawn to observe the Waning Crescent Moon appear between Mars and Jupiter. On 23 June, the Waning Crescent Moon will appear close to Mars.

Jupiter is observable during the second part of the night – constellation of Pisces till 25 June, in Cetus from 26 June. 

Saturn will be visible during the second part of the night. It rises earlier as the month progresses – on 30 June before midnight (2346 CET). It currently appears in the constellation of Capricornus. 

Uranus will not be visible in June.

Neptune will become observable towards the end of June in the constellation of Pisces. (E/SE second part of the night until dawn).

Phenomena not to miss in June

Early summer nights are dominated by the constellation of Boötes with it’s brightest star, red giant Arcturus. The imaginary “summer triangle” is now visible before midnight with Vega (in Lyra), Daneb (in Cygnus) and Altair (in Aquila). But it’s too early for Deep Sky Astrophotography – at least in Switzerland.

In the northern hemisphere, nights are short in June – in some parts of in the North, there is no night at all. So it’s not an ideal month for astronomy doings. But weather permitting and if you’re up early, this month will be great to observe Planets Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. Also, depending on your latitude, you may be able to observe the occasional noctilucent clouds: “Noctilucent clouds are extremely rare collections of ice crystals, occasionally appearing in late clear summer evenings after sunset, but before it gets completely dark. They become visible about the same time as the brightest stars appear and often stay visible after dark because they are still reflecting sunlight due to their great height. They are higher up than any other clouds, occupying the layer of atmosphere known as the Mesosphere, and are only seen at latitudes between 45°N and 80°N in the Northern Hemisphere…” (Source: MetOffice UK).

Alternatively, it’s an ideal month for observing the Sun – only with adequate solar viewing equipment! Deep Sky and Milky Way Photography will have to wait till July/August – at least here in northern/western Europe.

14Supermoon (Strawberry Moon)
21Summer Solstice at 0914 UTC (1014 CET)
22Waning Crescent Moon appears between Mars and Jupiter
Astronomical phenomena June 2022

Bright stars

NameMag.RiseTransitElev.SetAng. Size
Vega0.0016h23m2h31m+81°51’30.62″12h39m
Capella0.0513h14m+88°51’34.96″
Arcturus0.1514h38m22h09m+62°07’12.50″5h41m
Altair0.7521h02m3h46m+51°59’30.46″10h29m
Spica0.9516h04m21h19m+31°47’55.61″2h34m
Antares1.0520h28m0h24m+16°37’32.96″4h20m
Deneb1.254h36m+88°24’07.39″
Shaula1.6022h58m1h28m+6°04’18.71″3h59m
Mirfak1.7511h21m+86°57’43.22″
Alioth1.7520h48m+81°06’12.00″
Kaus Australis1.7523h21m2h19m+8°46’46.56″5h17m
Alkaid1.8521h41m+87°42’07.65″
Sargas1.850h45m1h32m+0°30’40.15″2h20m
Menkalinan1.9013h53m+88°00’03.74″
Polaris1.9510h55m+47°36’18.95″
Dubhe2.0018h57m+75°19’04.61″
Alpheratz2.0523h31m8h04m+72°15’54.74″16h37m
Mirach2.0523h36m9h06m+78°47’00.63″18h35m
Algol2.050h15m11h05m+84°04’02.55″21h54m
Kochab2.0522h44m+62°53’27.69″
Rasalhague2.0518h30m1h29m+55°36’26.36″8h29m
Nunki2.0522h53m2h50m+16°50’13.90″6h48m
Denebola2.1012h34m19h43m+57°30’27.60″2h51m
Navi2.158h53m+76°06’39.08″
Almach2.1522h12m10h00m+85°27’43.93″21h48m
Shedar2.208h36m+80°17’06.73″
Algieba2.2010h38m18h13m+62°47’14.05″1h49m
Mizar2.2021h17m+82°07’49.75″
Alphecca2.2015h13m23h29m+69°41’15.69″7h44m
Eltanin2.201h50m+85°27’49.32″
Sadr2.2017h43m4h17m+83°22’45.60″14h51m
Caph2.258h05m+77°40’12.71″
Larawag2.2521h46m0h45m+8°49’06.62″3h43m
Merak2.3018h55m+80°41’01.05″
Dschubba2.3519h36m23h55m+20°24’26.09″4h13m
Mula2.3523h30m1h37m+4°11’51.29″3h45m
Enif2.3522h51m5h39m+53°02’24.61″12h27m
Phecda2.4019h47m+83°22’13.69″
Scheat2.4022h33m6h59m+71°15’27.33″15h25m
Sabik2.4520h11m1h05m+27°19’54.57″5h59m
Aljanah2.4519h28m4h41m+77°06’27.60″13h54m
Alderamin2.455h13m+74°16’24.92″
Markab2.4523h47m7h00m+58°23’05.31″14h13m
Izar2.5014h21m22h39m+70°01’47.42″6h57m
Saik2.5019h14m0h32m+32°27’58.55″5h50m
Zosma2.5511h29m19h08m+63°27’35.96″2h47m
Zubeneschamali2.6017h48m23h11m+33°36’28.66″4h34m
Unukalhai2.6017h07m23h38m+49°24’56.75″6h10m
Acrab2.6019h26m24h00m+23°13’12.40″4h33m
Ruchbah2.659h22m+76°35’39.53″
Muphrid2.6514h21m21h48m+61°20’33.81″5h16m
Yed Prior2.7018h20m0h09m+39°19’16.70″5h57m
Athebyne2.700h17m+75°29’21.88″
Lesath2.7022h57m1h26m+5°52’55.50″3h54m
Kaus Media2.7022h42m2h16m+13°18’07.63″5h50m
Tarazed2.7020h50m3h41m+53°43’52.74″10h32m
Zubenelgenubi II2.7517h53m22h45m+26°56’49.33″3h37m
Kornephoros2.7516h40m0h24m+64°30’03.85″8h09m
Rastaban2.751h24m+84°39’55.46″
Cebalrai2.7519h14m1h38m+47°37’31.36″8h02m
Algenib2.800h56m8h09m+58°21’57.30″15h22m
Paikauhale2.8020h46m0h30m+14°51’05.89″4h15m
Kaus Borealis2.8022h20m2h23m+17°41’39.05″6h25m
Cor Caroli2.8510h50m20h50m+81°14’30.86″6h49m
Vindemiatrix2.8514h04m20h56m+53°54’01.71″3h48m
Fang2.8519h55m23h53m+16°55’26.63″3h51m
ζ Her2.8515h44m0h35m+74°37’06.43″9h26m
Albaldah2.8522h37m3h05m+22°06’16.66″7h32m
Deneb Algedi2.850h49m5h42m+27°03’28.67″10h35m
γ Per2.9011h01m+83°20’19.56″
ε Per2.901h25m11h54m+83°06’00.05″22h23m
Sadalsuud2.9023h46m5h27m+37°35’57.81″11h07m
Matar2.9021h57m6h38m+73°23’27.84″15h20m
Algenubi2.959h42m17h39m+66°43’45.54″1h36m
Girtab2.9523h51m1h42m+3°08’43.23″3h34m
Alnasl2.9522h31m2h01m+12°41’59.85″5h30m
Okab2.9519h54m3h00m+56°57’32.92″10h06m
Sadalmelik2.9523h58m6h01m+42°51’24.49″12h04m
Mizan3.000h43m10h06m+78°08’08.59″19h28m
Almaaz3.0012h59m+86°50’17.72″
ψ UMa3.0019h03m+87°24’39.03″
Seginus3.0012h26m22h26m+81°14’55.03″8h25m
Pherkad3.0023h14m+65°11’57.13″
Xamidimura3.0022h27m0h47m+5°07’37.11″3h06m
Source: Stellarium.org

Globular star clusters

NameMag.RiseTransitElev.Set
M 22 (Great Sagittarius Cluster)5.1022h20m2h31m+19°12’45.77″6h43m
M 13 (Great Star Cluster in Hercules)5.8014h59m0h36m+79°28’25.13″10h13m
M 4 (Crab Globular Cluster)5.9020h23m0h18m+16°31’46.86″4h14m
M 71 (Angelfish Cluster)6.1020h18m3h48m+61°53’50.67″11h19m
M 36.2013h09m21h36m+71°18’56.18″6h02m
M 15 (Pegasus Cluster)6.3022h27m5h25m+55°19’36.18″12h23m
M 26.3023h27m5h29m+42°20’40.40″11h30m
M 106.4019h05m0h52m+38°56’15.56″6h38m
M 926.401h11m+86°09’52.99″
M 5 (Rose Cluster)6.6517h00m23h13m+45°03’47.97″5h26m
NGC 59866.9221h18m23h41m+5°20’51.27″2h03m
Source: Stellarium.org

Messier Objects

NameMag.RiseTransitElev.Set
M 7 (Ptolemy’s Cluster)3.3022h55m1h49m+8°21’36.28″4h43m
M 31 (Andromeda Galaxy)3.4421h40m8h38m+84°25’41.13″19h37m
M 6 (Butterfly Cluster)4.2022h19m1h35m+10°52’12.53″4h51m
M 394.605h27m+88°24’10.14″
M 24 (Small Sagittarius Star Cloud)4.6021h31m2h12m+24°32’45.80″6h52m
M 254.6021h49m2h27m+23°59’16.84″7h04m
M 22 (Great Sagittarius Cluster)5.1022h20m2h31m+19°12’45.77″6h43m
M 34 (Spiral Cluster)5.2010h38m+85°52’31.68″
M 235.5021h14m1h52m+24°06’04.25″6h30m
M 33 (Triangulum Galaxy)5.720h45m9h30m+73°49’21.28″18h15m
M 13 (Great Star Cluster in Hercules)5.8014h59m0h36m+79°28’25.13″10h13m
M 4 (Crab Globular Cluster)5.9020h23m0h18m+16°31’46.86″4h14m
M 21 (Webb’s Cross)5.9021h39m1h59m+20°36’24.71″6h18m
M 8 (Lagoon Nebula)6.0021h50m1h58m+18°43’23.44″6h07m
M 16 (Eagle Nebula)6.0021h10m2h13m+29°17’00.61″7h17m
M 17 (Omega Nebula)6.0021h23m2h16m+26°55’21.37″7h08m
M 71 (Angelfish Cluster)6.1020h18m3h48m+61°53’50.67″11h19m
M 36.2013h09m21h36m+71°18’56.18″6h02m
M 20 (Trifid Nebula)6.3021h41m1h57m+20°07’30.57″6h14m
M 11 (Wild Duck Cluster)6.3021h08m2h46m+36°49’49.00″8h23m
M 15 (Pegasus Cluster)6.3022h27m5h25m+55°19’36.18″12h23m
M 26.3023h27m5h29m+42°20’40.40″11h30m
M 106.4019h05m0h52m+38°56’15.56″6h38m
M 926.401h11m+86°09’52.99″
M 29 (Cooling Tower Cluster)6.6018h14m4h19m+81°38’50.17″14h23m
M 5 (Rose Cluster)6.6517h00m23h13m+45°03’47.97″5h26m
M 18 (Black Swan Cluster)6.9021h27m2h15m+25°59’36.60″7h02m
M 52 (Cassiopeia Salt-and-Pepper Cluster)6.907h20m+75°14’06.17″
M 81 (Bode’s Galaxy)6.9417h49m+67°59’38.85″
M 62 (Flickering Globular Cluster)7.3921h24m0h56m+12°58’37.59″4h28m
M 1037.409h29m+76°10’59.21″
M 27 (Dumbbell Nebula)7.4020h02m3h54m+65°50’25.80″11h46m
M 55 (Specter Cluster)7.420h09m3h35m+12°12’44.73″7h01m
M 197.4721h00m0h57m+16°48’23.05″4h54m
M 287.6622h13m2h19m+18°14’38.10″6h25m
M 12 (Gumball Globular Cluster)7.6818h46m0h42m+41°04’58.16″6h37m
M 537.7013h40m21h07m+61°06’25.19″4h33m
M 547.7023h21m2h50m+12°40’18.94″6h19m
M 30 (Jellyfish Cluster)7.701h19m5h36m+20°01’01.96″9h52m
M 101 (Pinwheel Galaxy)7.8621h57m+82°41’42.14″
M 807.8719h55m0h11m+20°03’58.14″4h28m
M 104 (Sombrero Galaxy)8.0015h21m20h34m+31°19’55.03″1h47m
M 268.0021h16m2h40m+33°43’00.95″8h04m
Source: Stellarium.org

Sources:

In-the-Sky.org
Keller Hans-Ulrich, Kosmos Himmels-Jahr 2022
Stellarium.org